Evidence

1. Patients receiving preoperative PT showed a 29% reduction in post- acute care use cost reduction of $1,215 (n = 4733)

Associations between preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care utilization patterns and cost in total joint replacement.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25274793

2. Patients given multimedia education had statistically significantly shorter hospital stays (t = 2.54, P < 0.05), higher self-efficacy (t = 7.93, P < 0.001), and higher functional activity (t = 4.33, P <0.001).

Effects of multimedia with printed nursing guide in education on self-efficacy and functional activity and hospitalization in patients with hip replacement
http://www.pec-journal.com/article/S0738-3991(04)00195-8/abstract

3. The present study supports the use of preoperative training in end -stage OA patients to improve early postoperative outcomes. High- intensity strength training during the preoperative period reduces pain and improves lower limb muscle strength, ROM and functional task performance before surgery, resulting in a reduced length of stay at the hospital and a faster physical and functional recovery after TKA. The present training programme can be used by specialists to speed up recovery after TKA.

High-intensity preoperative training improves physical and functional recovery in the early post-operative periods after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.
link http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26768606

4. The following significant risk factors for PJI were identified: body mass index; diabetes mellitus, hypoalbuminaemia, blood transfusion, superficial surgical site infection... .

Risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection after total joint arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25575769

5. Exercise participation prior to total joint arthroplasty dramatically reduces the odds (adjusted odds ratio 0.27, 95% CI) of inpatient rehabilitation.

Effect of preoperative exercise on measures of functional status in men and women undergoing total hip and knee arthroplasty
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.22223/full

6. Prehabilitation improves physical function even in the compromised patients with OA awaiting TJA.

Prehabilitation improves physical function of individuals with severe disability from hip or knee osteoarthritis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24403671

7. Fear of pain and avoidance of movement are strongly correlated both with the acute post-operative pain perception and recovery after surgery up to 1 year, thus presenting a relevant clinical impact on the outcome after TKA.

Patient kinesiophobia affects both recovery time and final outcome after total knee arthroplasty
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26685685

8. Several interventions can be used together in a multi-modal fashion, or integrated into a clinical pathway to achieve better functional outcomes, enhance recovery, and reduce hospital stay. Reviewed interventions include intensive pre-operative patient education and pre-operative nutritional status.

Peri-operative interventions producing better functional outcomes and enhanced recovery following total hip and knee arthroplasty: an evidence-based review
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23406499

9. The principal predictive factor of the postoperative range of motion was the preoperative range of motion.

Predicting Range of Motion After Total Knee Arthroplasty
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12851353

10. Anxiety and depression and higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score were independent predictors of complications.
Respectively, 12.7% and 6.4% of knee and the hip arthroplasty patients had concomitant depression or anxiety. Knee patients had $3420 higher episode of care costs in patients with depression/anxiety (P b .001).

Direct Cost and Complications Associated With Total Joint Arthroplasty in Patients With Preoperative Anxiety and Depression
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481408